Isn’t It Bromantic?

A portmanteau of the words brother and romance as well as my literary cocktail of choice, the “bromance” relationship is considered to be “the complicated love and affection shared by two straight males” according to the Urban Dictionary (also fondly known as “hetero-life-mate”). This mutual form of deep understanding has become not only widely publicized by Hollywood blockbusters, but a trendy new way to describe the mechanics of an essentially ineffable relationship. Think of Captain Kirk and Commander Spock, Sherlock Holmes and John Watson, and not to be forgetting the ladies, Thelma and Louise. With the absence of one, the other could not have developed as a layered, lovable character who inspired obsessions with the voracity of swarming bees.

Last month, Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary officially added the word “bromance,” citing expansive usage as the reason for the inclusion. There is also a movement on Facebook of over 36,000 supporters to add “bromance” as a relationship status option. Not convinced yet? Fear not! I have the determination of a rabid fangirl on a shipping meme (hopefully I haven’t lost you yet).

How does this translate to traversing the romance genre, you may ask? This is why I am here for you, o lurkers from another internet land! We begin with L.J. McDonald’s The Shattered Sylph. (If you haven’t read this series yet, I trust you will promptly vacate the internet and visit your nearest bookstore. Go on—I’ll wait.). In it, a pair of supporting characters from the first installment return to make their debut as main characters and thus, establish a bromance worthy of the ages. Enter Leon, the staunchly loyal veteran accompanied by his battle sylph, the ever-grousing Ril. The two must overcome old prejudices and learn to trust one another. It isn’t as easy as it may sound! The book deals with an onslaught of deterrents and how the pair must resolve each one effectively—which can only be accomplished with the other in tow. Funny how that works, isn’t it?

I can hear the protests from across the digital database already. What if the bromance duo is related, you wonder? It just so happens the reader discovers the answer to this very question in Rose Lerner’s A Lily Among Thorns. (Is this some ploy to convince you to read another second installment of an excellent series? Yes. Yes, it is.) Solomon is a sprightly leading man, made all the more charming with his quirky predilection for good tailoring. In direct contrast, the loss of his twin Elijah casts an unrelenting cloud of despair over his life. Is their separation truly the end, or merely a prelude to an even more enlightening bromance? Though I will hardly reveal the secrets surrounding this delightful little intrigue, I can certainly urge you to ascertain the truth for yourself.

My dear anons of the internet underbelly, of which we are all part—I confess the following giveaway question is entirely selfish of me. I fully intend to gather a list of titles to read based on your responses! Surely you won’t disappoint.

Giveaway: What beloved literary bromances do you know of? Tell us and you might win a free e-book download of a surprise bromance novel!

Signing off,

Jillian—The Zombie Intern

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4 Responses to Isn’t It Bromantic?

  1. Nicola O. says:

    Vishous and Butch, in J.R. Ward’s Black Dagger Brotherhood series. And all the other guys, too, but especially those two.
    Mary Jo Putney’s Fallen Angels.

    • Allison Carroll, Editorial and Web Coordinator says:

      Congrats Nicola! You’ve been selected as the winner of the giveaway. Email contests@dorchesterpub.com and we’ll set you up with a free e-book download from the Dorchester Web site.
      Happy Reading,
      Allison Carroll
      Dorchester Publishing

  2. J says:

    There’s a bit of one in Elizabeth George’s series between Linley and Simon.

  3. Azzell says:

    In Azimov’s “Lucky Starr” series there is a bit of a “bromance” between the main character, Lucky Starr, and J. Bigman Jones. That really dates me!

    And in Bujold’s “Miles Vorkosigan” novels, there is a bit of one between Miles himself and Bothari.

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